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J.R.R. Tolkien Estate, Warner Bros. Resolve $80 Million Lawsuit

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Published on:
Jul/04/2017

The estate of author J.R.R. Tolkien has resolved an $80 million lawsuit against the Hollywood studio behind "Lord of the Rings" after it licensed various characters and trademarks to online casinos.

The settlement of the estate's 2012 complaint for copyright infringement and breach of contract against Warner Bros. was revealed in a Friday filing in Los Angeles federal court, according to NBC’s Southern California affiliate.

The estate claimed in its suit that Warner Bros. did not have the right to license said characters.

Terms of the settlement were not immediately disclosed.

- Aaron Goldstein, Gambling911.com

 

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